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Thursday, July 9, 2020 | History

6 edition of Alternative fuels for maritime use found in the catalog.

Alternative fuels for maritime use

by National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Alternative Fuels for Maritime Use.

  • 18 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ships -- Fuel.,
  • Marine engines.,
  • Ship propulsion.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementprepared by the Committee on Alternative Fuels for Maritime Use of the Maritime Transportation Research Board, Commission on Sociotechnical Systems, National Research Council.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsVM779 .N37 1980
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 191 p. :
    Number of Pages191
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4124773M
    ISBN 100309030889
    LC Control Number80082058
    OCLC/WorldCa6890715

    Study on the use of ethyl and methyl alcohol as alternative fuels in shipping Final Report Version Authors: Joanne Ellis (SSPA Sweden AB) Kim Tanneberger (LR EMEA) Report prepared for the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) Disclaimer: The content of this report represents the views of the authors only and should not be taken. Some well-known alternative fuels include bio-diesel, bio-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, butane), refuse-derived fuel, chemically stored electricity (batteries and fuel cells), hydrogen, non-fossil methane, non-fossil natural gas, vegetable oil, propane and other biomass sources.

      Three life cycle assessments have been carried out for maritime fuel cell systems. Two of them assume continued use of diesel fuels for the traditional engine-generator sets, while renewables are considered only for the fuel cell system,. However, a complete life cycle assessment should evaluate the use of renewable fuels in conventional.   One of the driving factors behind the push towards alternative fuels like LNG from heavy fuel oils (HFOs) can be owed to decisive environmental regulations set out by the International Maritime Organization (IMO). Starting January , a global sulphur cap of % will be imposed on ships trading outside of emission control areas.

    Read the Energy Transition Outlook report with a focus on the maritime sector. Increasing concern over the impact of human activities on our environment is encouraging the maritime transport industry to move towards the use of alternative fuels on ships as a prime source of.


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Alternative fuels for maritime use by National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Alternative Fuels for Maritime Use. Download PDF EPUB FB2

National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Alternative Fuels for Maritime Use. Alternative fuels for maritime use. Washington, D.C.: National Academy of Sciences, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: National Research Council (U.S.).

Committee on Alternative Fuels for Maritime Use. ISBN: This paper outlines the growing number of shipboard applications of new, alternative fuels such as: low sulphur fuels, gas fuels and biofuels in the global maritime transport.

This book relates to fuel use in the marine sector in the age of climate change. It is a valuable source of detailed information on: fuel standards and fuel types (eg fossil fuels, reduced Alternative fuels for maritime use book fuels, and alternative fuels such as LNG, biofuels, hydrogen, electricity, wind and solar power)Brand: Witherby Seamanship International.

This guidance paper provides an introduction to alternative fuels and technology solutions. It includes an overview of selected alternative ship fuels – LNG, LPG, methanol, biofuel and hydrogen – as well as emerging technologies such as batteries, fuel cell systems and wind-assisted propulsion.

“Biofuels are low carbon fuels, not zero emission fuels. Only zero C fuels deliver decarbonisation. Biofuels done wrong increase CO2 - look at the EU 25% EU biodiesel feedstock = imported palm oil Proper carbon accounting critical - DLUC & ILUC Acute lack of transparency about EU biofuel data and use.

Seven alternative marine fuels—liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied biogas (LBG), methanol from natural gas, renewable methanol, hydrogen for fuel cells produced from (i) natural gas or (ii) electrolysis based on renewable electricity, and hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO)—and heavy fuel oil (HFO) as benchmark are included and ranked by ten performance criteria and their relative.

Among the proposed alternative fuels for shipping, DNV GL identified LNG, LPG, methanol, biofuel and hydrogen as the most promising solutions. Among the new technologies, the class society believes. The study examines six such fuels, having LNG as a comparison. These fuels are: Hydrogen; Ammonia; Methanol; LPG; Advanced biodiesel (HVO); Electricity (in batteries).

In terms of parameters of the study, it is divided into four categories. One giant cargo ship emits nearly as much pollution as 50 million cars. That was the jaw-dropping nugget in a Guardian story way back in For years, there has been a movement to introduce alternative fuels to the world’s maritime industry.

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) has set January 1,as the starting date from which only low-sulfur fuel oil will be allowed to be used for ships. So shippers are exploring. The ones most commonly considered today are Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Electricity, Biodiesel, and Methanol.

Other fuels that could play a role in the future are Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), Ethanol, Dimethyl Ether (DME), Biogas, Synthetic Fuels, Hydrogen (particularly for use in fuel cells), and Nuclear fuel. To meet these caps, maritime companies are exploring a range of clean fuel alternatives.

From increasingly common LNG solutions, via “start-up” fuels such as LPG, methanol and biofuels, to less developed options such as hydrogen and ammonia - everything is on the table.

The alternative fuels frontrunner: LNG. In a new White Paper, the classification society considers these fuels alongside wind-assisted propulsion, batteries, and fuel cell systems to have reasonable potential for ship applications in the future.

VPO Global takes a look at some of the factors of alternative technologies and fuels in maritime applications. ALTERNATIVE FUELS. LNG. High Potential of Alternative Fuels as Clean Energy Alt Fuels NOx Sox PM CO2 LNG Over 90 % (Pre-mixed) 90 –97 % 90 % 23 % 20 –30 % (Gas Injection) LPG 30 –50 % (Gas Injection) 20 % MeOH 15 –20 % (Gas Injection) 10 % Reduction Exh Gas vs FO Diesel Engine (Tier II) Crowly Maritime ConRo船.

Other fuels that could play a role in the future are Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), Ethanol, Dimethyl Ether (DME), Biogas, Synthetic Fuels, Hydrogen (particularly for use in fuel cells), and Nuclear fuel.

All these fuels are virtually sulphur free, and can be used for compliance with sulphur content regulations. Alternative fuels 14 Alternative technologies 15 4 INTERNATIONAL REGULATIONS AND CLASS RULES 16 5 ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND TECHNOLOGIES – A BRIEF OVERVIEW 17 Principles 17 Reference fuels – HFO and MGO 18 LNG 20 LPG 22 Methanol 24 Biofuels New technologies and alternative fossil fuels.

Among the proposed alternative fuels for shipping, DNV GL has identified LNG, LPG, methanol, biofuel and hydrogen as the most promising solutions. Among new technologies, the classification society believes battery systems, fuel cells and wind-assisted propulsion to offer potential for ship applications.

Researchers have studied on alternative fuels that can be used with gasoline and diesel fuels. Alternative fuels such as hydrogen, acetylene, natural gas, ethanol and biofuels also uses in internal combustion engines.

Hydrogen in the gas phase is about 14 times lighter than the air. Moreover, it is the cleanest fuel in the world. On the other hand because of its high ignition limit (4–75%. Alternative fuels for marine transport can play a crucial role in decarbonising the shipping sector and ultimately contribute towards climate change goals.

Market penetration by alternative fuels have already begun with ship builders, engine manufacturers and classification bodies by introducing greener ships running on cleaner fuels.

In shipping and rail industries, liquefied natural gas (LNG) has proven to be the most cost effective and beneficial alternative fuel source.

In fleet and cargo handling operations, compressed natural gas (CNG) and LNG are both reliable alternatives, subject to the particular application and task.

Liquefied natural gas is still a fossil fuel, but much cleaner, and infrastructure allowing its use is becoming more widespread. Biofuels are also being explored as an alternative – one.Alternative fuels will be needed not only to meet (and hopefully exceed) the International Maritime Organisation's target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50% by compared to levels.

They will play also an important role in helping the .The shipping industry is beginning to evaluate ammonia as a potential “bunker fuel,” a carbon-free alternative to the heavy fuel oil (HFO) used in maritime transport. International trade associations are leading the effort to decarbonize the sector, in alignment with targets set by the Paris Climate Agreement.